Monthly Archives: March 2014

Review Activity Ideas

During the Teacher Quality Grant class today, we began preparing for the Post-Test that will take place in two weeks. Class participants shared a variety of ways that they conduct reviews in their junior high and high school classrooms. This group of teachers shares some very interesting games that they have used to engage students and get them more excited about math. Here are the ideas they shared:

  1. Jeopardy®: This is a classic game where students compete for points by selecting a category and point value. The question (or answer) is revealed and they are given the opportunity to buzz in and answer. Some of the teacher use PowerPoint presentations designed but this can even be done low-tech with a board with numbers and the questions read off of a handout.
  2. Around the Room: Papers with an answer at the top half and an answer on the bottom half are hung around the room. On each page, the answer does not match the question. Students are sent to a starting point (each can have a different starting point). Once they figure out the answer to the question, they find the page that has that answer at the top. Then, they answer the question at the bottom of that page and hunt for its answer. This trek takes them Around the Room.
  3. Clicker Questions: If the technology is present, teachers and create clicker questions and use a personal response system to have students answer the questions as they go.
  4. Bingo: Just like regular bingo, except the cards have the answers to questions instead of just numbers. The questions are read one at a time and the students get to mark their square if they have the answer on their card. One great idea to create the cards was to have a long list of answers on the board and let the students create their own cards at the beginning of the review. This way you don’t have to figure out a way to generate random bingo cards.
  5. Easter Egg Hunt or Scavenger Hunt: Hide the questions in Easter eggs around the room. The hunt is fun enough by itself, but you can have them accumulate points by answering the questions.
  6. Relay: Place the questions at one end of the room, have teams run down and get the question. Once they get the right answer, they can run down and get the next question.
  7. Tic Tac Toe (very low prep): Divide up into two teams, each team takes its turn by getting a question. If they get it right they can take their turn on the tic tac toe board. If they get it wrong, the other team can have an attempt at the question. Keep going until someone wins the game.
  8. Football, Baseball or Basketball: Prepare a list of questions that are worth different values. For example, in football, questions could be worth 5 yards, 10 yards and 15 yards. In basketball, they could be a free throw, 2 pts or 3 pts. In baseball, they would be a single, double, triple or homerun. In each game, you can follow the usual rule so of the sport but the way they make plays is by answering the question.
  9. Trash Can Basketball: Questions are given a value equal to some distance from the trash can. The easier the question, the farther away from the can. If the team gets a question right, they get to shoot a wadded up piece of paper at the trash can. If they make it they score a point.
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